The duality of childhood and larger-than-life ego of a coming-of-age youth in the urban background around the center of New York City. #ART, #Lipstick and #Soulmates   (at Rockefeller Center)

The duality of childhood and larger-than-life ego of a coming-of-age youth in the urban background around the center of New York City. #ART, #Lipstick and #Soulmates (at Rockefeller Center)

#Prohibited #ArtSelfie with 2 of #AndyWarhol’s #13MostWantedMen from the 1964 #WorldsFair. Warhol screen printed portraits of #NYPDs most wanted criminals and days later Gov Rockefeller had them silvered over due to controversy during an election year. He revisited the project with the prints you see behind moi. Warhol has said the silver squares were “#SoNothing” it was “#MoreMe now”. #ART! (at Queens Museum)

#Prohibited #ArtSelfie with 2 of #AndyWarhol’s #13MostWantedMen from the 1964 #WorldsFair. Warhol screen printed portraits of #NYPDs most wanted criminals and days later Gov Rockefeller had them silvered over due to controversy during an election year. He revisited the project with the prints you see behind moi. Warhol has said the silver squares were “#SoNothing” it was “#MoreMe now”. #ART! (at Queens Museum)

#ART! (at 5 Pointz)

#ART! (at 5 Pointz)

You see, if you don’t take money they can’t tell you what to do. That’s the key to the whole thing, don’t touch money! It’s the worst thing you can do. Money is the cheapest thing. Liberty is the most expensive.

Superstar NY Times Street Fashion Photographer Bill Cunningham explaining why he didn’t accept payment for the 100 page spreads of photographs he shot for the original Details magazine in the late 80’s. From the documentary Bill Cunningham New York.

I just saw this movie & it was super inspiring. Dude lived in a rent controlled small, no-frills room/studio in carnegie hall with a shared bathroom & no kitchen since the 40s. He never eats or drinks at any events he works at out of principle and even quit Women’s Wear Daily because they used his pictures as “Do’s & Don’ts”, when he felt all of them were do’s. He’s a very hardworking man that’s just all about loving clothes and being positive.

The Art of Happiness: Money is the cheapest thing

newmuseum:

Daniel Joseph Martinez’s Museum Tags: Second Movement (Overture) or Overture con Claque – Overture with Hired Audience Members 1993 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art is on view as part of “NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star”, closing today.

sad i missed this

newmuseum:

Daniel Joseph Martinez’s Museum Tags: Second Movement (Overture) or Overture con Claque – Overture with Hired Audience Members 1993 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art is on view as part of “NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star”, closing today.

sad i missed this

City Council meeting for the future of #5ptz in #LongIslandCity. #art #community #TheyPavedParadiseAndPutUpAParkingLot  (at MoMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center)

City Council meeting for the future of #5ptz in #LongIslandCity. #art #community #TheyPavedParadiseAndPutUpAParkingLot (at MoMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center)

@cobykennedy @artnowny #ART! #brooklyn  (at ArtNowNy |2nd Floor)

@cobykennedy @artnowny #ART! #brooklyn (at ArtNowNy |2nd Floor)

Barbara Kruger’s nearly six-foot-by-eight-foot Untitled (Questions) (1991, at left) poses some of democracy’s most fundamental questions in a format derived from a super-sized American flag. Kruger asks how we define Americanism and patriotism — and includes a pointed warning about America’s historical tendency toward jingoism. “Who is beyond the law?” Kruger asks. Her question is timeless and is applicable to plenty of events, but it would have seemed particularly relevant the year was made, when Clarence Thomas denied Anita Hill’s damning accusations of sexual harassment just after President George H. W. Bush’s nominated him to the Supreme Court. Kruger’s next questions seem intended for the men of the Senate Judiciary Committee who shrugged off Hill’s testimony: “Who speaks? Who is silenced?” and finally, “Who laughs last?” (via “September 11″ at MoMA’s PS1 | Tyler Green: Modern Art Notes | ARTINFO.com)

Barbara Kruger’s nearly six-foot-by-eight-foot Untitled (Questions) (1991, at left) poses some of democracy’s most fundamental questions in a format derived from a super-sized American flag. Kruger asks how we define Americanism and patriotism — and includes a pointed warning about America’s historical tendency toward jingoism. “Who is beyond the law?” Kruger asks. Her question is timeless and is applicable to plenty of events, but it would have seemed particularly relevant the year was made, when Clarence Thomas denied Anita Hill’s damning accusations of sexual harassment just after President George H. W. Bush’s nominated him to the Supreme Court. Kruger’s next questions seem intended for the men of the Senate Judiciary Committee who shrugged off Hill’s testimony: “Who speaks? Who is silenced?” and finally, “Who laughs last?” (via “September 11″ at MoMA’s PS1 | Tyler Green: Modern Art Notes | ARTINFO.com)

staceythinx:

Charybdis by William Pye is an installation with a spinning vortex that can be observed from multiple levels.

About the piece:

The sirens Charybdis and Scylla resided in the Sicilian Sea. Homer tells us that because Charybdis had stolen the oxen of Hercules, Zeus struck her with a thunderbolt and changed her into a whirlpool whose vortex swallowed up ships. In Charybdis the circular movement of water inside a transparent acrylic cylinder forms an air-core vortex in the centre. Steps wrap around the cylinder and allow spectators to view the vortex from above. 

How it works:

An air-core vortex is generated within a circular dish. Water rises and falls within the dish in a cyclic program of water activity. When the system is full and flowing over the perimeter and down the sides, the top surface is comparatively flat and smooth, only broken by the vortex in the middle. However, as the level drops, the body of water seems to take on a life of its own, increasingly rocking and swaying as its volume diminishes unaided by any outside force.

onesheetrepository:

Toy Story (1995) - Tom Whalen

onesheetrepository:

Toy Story (1995) - Tom Whalen

hypna:

Nicky Assmann’s ‘Solace’ Art Installation Explores the Iridescent Qualities of Soap

If you’ve ever been completely mesmerized by the amazing colors that appear on soap bubbles, then you will love Nicky Assmann’s award-winning Solace art installation. Comprised of a mechanical device that gradually slides a long swath of soapy film (made up of glycerol and water, mostly) upwards from a flat platform along with a sophisticated array of lights, the demonstration reveals how the film refracts light as gravity pulls the heavier water down

Video:

WORD. starting to get down with the UES…
artsfortransit:

Chuck Close talks about his Arts for Transit Subway project
News Flash! Carol Vogel writes in today’s New York Times:
Here’s something positive for art lovers, anyway: Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts for Transit has commissioned Chuck Close to create a permanent installation for the 86th Street and Second Avenue station, which is scheduled to open in 2016.
In the article, Vogel reports:
Instead of painting portraits, Mr. Close will be creating mosaics. “My work has always had a mosaiclike quality to it,” Mr. Close said in a telephone interview. “So it’s not such a stretch. The idea is to reflect the riding population: old people, young people, people of color, Asians. I’m going to do as many as 12 separate mosaics, mainly from pictures of artists I’ve taken over the years.”
He added, “The richness of the city is all the various cultures coming together, and the richness of my art will be to simultaneously let people in on how many ways there are to build an image.”
We can’t wait for you to see it!!!
Photo: Laura Miller, courtesy of the artist and Pace Wildenstein

WORD. starting to get down with the UES…

artsfortransit:

Chuck Close talks about his Arts for Transit Subway project

News Flash! Carol Vogel writes in today’s New York Times:

Here’s something positive for art lovers, anyway: Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts for Transit has commissioned Chuck Close to create a permanent installation for the 86th Street and Second Avenue station, which is scheduled to open in 2016.

In the article, Vogel reports:

Instead of painting portraits, Mr. Close will be creating mosaics. “My work has always had a mosaiclike quality to it,” Mr. Close said in a telephone interview. “So it’s not such a stretch. The idea is to reflect the riding population: old people, young people, people of color, Asians. I’m going to do as many as 12 separate mosaics, mainly from pictures of artists I’ve taken over the years.”

He added, “The richness of the city is all the various cultures coming together, and the richness of my art will be to simultaneously let people in on how many ways there are to build an image.”

We can’t wait for you to see it!!!

Photo: Laura Miller, courtesy of the artist and Pace Wildenstein